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Friday, February 14, 2014

The Gifts of Christmas -- Dec. 28, 2013

Prisoners at Stateville had many reasons to be happy this Christmas. After a few weeks of intermittent cable reception, the old satellite TV dishes were replaced by a new company. Incarcerated men did not get an additional 100 networks or even one. It was the exact same contract only through a new vendor. On Christmas Day, prisoners received a large meal of roast turkey, pork, or both. Unlike last year, the meal did not cause widespread vomiting and diarrhea from food poisoning. For the first time in over a decade gift bags were distributed to inmates. However, unlike in the 1990s when men were given packs of cigarettes, bundles of candy and bags of nuts as well as various brand name soaps and shampoos, they received a brown bag of religious materials with a token candy bar and stale cookie. The gifts of Christmas are probably too numerous for me to recount, but I will attempt to do so without becoming too giddy with excitement.

I called home this week to learn my elderly mother is extremely ill. She believes she has the flu but is uncertain. I attempted to pressure her to see a doctor whereupon I was told she has an appointment in February. This is what I would expect at Stateville but not outside these walls. "Is Obamacare already causing such huge delays?" I asked. Apparently, she wanted to see a specific doctor and was too sick to go anywhere anyway. She had not left the house in weeks and with snow unshovelled, she was practically buried in. My father had left and there was no one to help her. As a prisoner, I could do nothing. I was as abandoned and helpless as she was.

Although I did not, many incarcerated men received visits this week including my cellmate. On Christmas Eve, I began my exercise routine early in the morning as customary. My cellmate typically sleeps until noon but surprised me by getting up and shaving. A few times he invaded my space in the front of the cell until I gave him a kick. He knows I do not like to be crowded and I thought it was rude of him to interrupt my workout. When his name was called for a visit I then understood why he was acting that way. He was trying to get ready for his visit and had overslept.

Anthony received a visit from his sister and niece. When he returned he was in a good mood and had forgotten that I had kicked him earlier. He told me a little about his visit and what his family was doing for Christmas. My immediate family was not doing anything and I was not aware of any plans by relatives. I have been incarcerated over two decades and rarely ever have any contact with aunts, uncles, cousins, or others. Possibly, I will get a Christmas card or two in late January, however, after so much time has passed, prisoners lose contact with family, myself included. With my father in South Carolina, I told my cellmate I will probably only receive a few visits a year if my mother dies.

Last Sunday was the Winter Solstice and it marked not only the first day of winter but the least amount of daylight. Throughout this week, I was glad to awaken before dawn and for the sun to set early. On the few days there was no cloud cover, I could see the dim light reflecting off the prison's 30 foot front wall when the guards counted prisoners between 3:30 and 4 p.m. The dark, cold, gray days did not bother me, but some of the cheerfulness of convicts was annoying. What were these men condemned to die so happy about?

Stateville's contract with a satellite TV service expired earlier this month. Inmates were dreaming Santa Claus would install a full range of cable networks. However, the administration simply switched satellite TV providers. The large black satellite dishes which were bolted into the concrete in the front of the main prison building were taken away and exchanged with two different ones. Inmates had a dozen networks before and now they have the same dozen after the switch.

Other than football, I found little of interest to watch on TV. Some prisoners thought the Chicago Bears were going to make the playoffs and I was able to profit off their delusion. Last Sunday the team was romped by the Philadelphia Eagles and on Thursday the Bears were given the extra gift of Christmas called Aaron Rodgers. Rodgers is the starting quarterback for the Green Bay Packers and one of the best in the NFL. After weeks of uncertainty, he was finally cleared to play against Chicago in the final game of the season to decide which team goes on to the playoffs. I anticipated the Bears being favored at home by a field goal to being an underdog by a field goal. A gambling addict and Bears' fan had already locked in bets with me. I am smugly confident the Packers will win tomorrow and add commissary to my property box.

My cellmate has a subscription to two TV guides, but despite how I looked for something to entertain me before going to sleep, I was at a loss. On Monday, I found myself momentarily watching Miley Cyrus. I asked Anthony what was this freak show that was on the CW. He told me it was called "The Jingle Ball." I was somewhat used to the pop singers antics including her wrecking ball video, butt dance, and "space cat," but this seemed to take things to a new level of absurdity. On the dance floor with her was a black female midget in a bikini of sorts except the top was two large tin man hats. I could not watch the nonsense and listened to my radio until I fell asleep.

The Koss stereo headphones which I so treasure developed a short. I use them so often while in the cell that the wire was bound to break eventually. It was not a matter of if, but when. Fortunately, they have a lifetime guarantee and on Christmas Eve when a cell house counselor was conducting rounds I gave him the paperwork to have the cost of postage and handling paid for. He took the money vouchers but not the headphones. He said it will probably take the business office a month or longer to process and in the meantime I may as well keep my headset. I have considered cutting into the wire to take out the short. I do not know if I have the patience to wait a couple of months to have sound in both ears and my backup pair of ear buds are not nearly as good at blocking out noises.

Later in the day, I noticed cell house workers packing up an inmate's property on the ground floor. When property was inventoried, it usually meant a transfer or trip to Seg.  Later at chow, I learned the man was sent to an outside hospital to have his foot cut off. Apparently, he had diabetes and because of the poor health care, gangrene had set in. Prisoners gossiped that his feet may not be the only body parts to be taken off but he could lose his legs. I asked how a person could not know their limbs were rotting and demand something to be done. One prisoner told me diabetics can cause numbness which can cause it to go unnoticed. I would rather be dead than lose my legs, and I wonder if he would have his feet amputated on Christmas day.

Christmas Eve had a morning low below zero and an afternoon high of only 15 degrees F. I did not realize how cold it was, however, until I left the cell house for dinner. Prisoners must walk a couple of blocks to reach the chow hall and unlike the previous night, a short tunnel passageway was not used. Walking in line, I regretted not putting on any thermal underwear. The polyester blue state pants provided to prisoners were thin and the jacket also had little insulation. Guards on the movement team, contrarily, were heavily dressed in clothing from head to toe. They even wore black ski masks so only their eyes were visible. When I returned to the cell, my cellmate asked me if I noticed the day shift sergeant. I had not recognized any of the staff outside in the dark in their winter ninja suits. He said he was only able to identify him by his long beard. We speculated he was not happy to be mandated to work two shifts on Christmas Eve and then have the assignment of being outside in the bitter cold rather than in the cell house.

After chow, I read about a few nitrogen fertilizer companies that were having trouble with sales due to competition from China and lower demand. I concluded the problem was temporary and their long term outlook was still good. While making my assessment, I took a break and noticed my cellmate was watching a Christmas choir. This was even worse than when I found him watching a remake of "The Sound of Music". He commented there was nothing else on television to watch when I made fun of him. No television was better than bad television, and I sat back down to review corporate reports. I put my half working headphones on and listened to a heavy metal cassette tape. No, I was not in the Christmas spirit. I would rather pull my fingernails out with pliers than engage in the delusion of Christmas cheer. Governor Quinn may have granted 36 requests for Executive Clemency, but I was not one of them.

Christmas morning, the cell house sergeant with the assistance of prison workers passed out gift bags donated by the Willow Creek Community Church in So. Barrington. For a couple of weeks prisoners had heard rumors of the donation and were looking forward to them with excitement. Stateville has not permitted a charity to give inmates gifts since the turn of the century. For prisoners who have been incarcerated a couple of decades or longer, they thought of cigarettes, candy, chocolates, and a variety of nice hygienic products not sold in the commissary. However, what they received was a little candy bar and a flat cardboard tasting cookie along with a stack of religious materials. Not surprisingly, these books and pamphlets quickly found their way into the garbage. The day after Christmas, I noticed a box by the door of the cell house filled with the Christian literature.

I had never heard of the Willow Creek Church until earlier this month when the talk radio show host Eric Muller aka "Mancow" mentioned that he attended it. I rarely watch the goofy Mancow Show except during commercials of morning news which I watch almost every day with my breakfast. My cellmate who stays up late at night will occasionally watch the shortened one hour re-telecast at midnight. He was the one who first told me about how the church planned to donate a Christmas package to inmates at Stateville. Mancow, from what I was told, supported the plan despite how he generally has a low regard for criminals because there were far too many people incarcerated and for excessive amounts of time.

Going to the chow hall for Christmas lunch was unpleasant for me. Everyone in the cell house left their cells and the lines were crowded and very noisy. Men pushed and rubbed against each other like cattle going into a feed chute. Behind the counter were a number of diverse and hokey holiday decorations. There was a picture drawn by an inmate of a sinister looking black Santa Claus and I told my cellmate he looked like he was robbing people of presents rather than giving them out. As for the Barack Obama Santa Claus with a big smile on his face, he was as well except he called it a redistribution of wealth. At the end of the line, I told a white kitchen worker that if they hang up any mistletoe he better be careful or he may be kissed by some homosexual.

Not everyone was gay and merry. While waiting in line I noticed a female kitchen supervisor who seemed sad, despite having on a red and white stocking cap with a fuzzy ball on top. For a moment I wondered what her real life was like outside the penitentiary. Prisoners are around many guards and other personnel, but we rarely get to know them. I assume most convicts do not care what these people do or how their lives are outside these walls. The administration even discourages staff from revealing personal information. However, I dislike superficiality and occasionally find myself pondering what the real lives, feelings, and personalities are of those I interact with.

After I left the line with my two Styrofoam trays of food, I sat at a table with an inmate who is known as "Sergeant Major". Sergeant Major is an old man in his 70's who rarely ever leaves his cell at the end of the gallery. He was in the army for nearly three decades before retiring. Previously, he told me how he was arrested for DUI's and released until he rammed into a car and killed its occupants. He is unlike most convicts here who I think of as criminal low lifes. Although I considered him a well grounded and conservative person, he surprised me with some of his wacky beliefs. For nearly an hour I listened to him talk about Area 51, space alien visitation, and various conspiracy theories. Despite how he at one time worked in the PTC, a Pentagon Intelligence agency, I thought he had lost some of his marbles going senile and being isolated in his cell for so long.

Sergeant Major is not the only military veteran I have met who is in prison due to drinking. My cellmate was drunk at the time of his offense as well. Most people will make a huge distinction between a car accident and a strangulation, however, what they fail to understand is the other drugs he was involuntarily intoxicated with which together could make the most peaceful man do the most violent acts. On the Monday before Christmas, CBS evening news had a 5-minute segment on Mefloquine, an inoculation for malaria the U.S. military uses. Despite that in 2009 the FDA warned the armed forces about the severe potential side effects of the drug, soldiers stationed in certain areas of the world continue to be given the shot. The inoculation is not a choice, and service members are not even told about the psychological disorders that may result. One interviewed combat veteran and his wife spoke of radical personality changes, including violent mood swings. The effects of the drug seem to be waning with time but his life was greatly impaired. These reports are one of thousands of independently verified claims.

Although there was no mail on Christmas, I received mail on the days before. One of the letters included several pages of new comments and emails readers had sent to me in November. On Christmas, I read through these and discovered a number of critical comments to my post "Lynched but Alive," not all of which were published. Those were in regarding my belief that my cellmate should not serve the rest of his life in prison. Anthony was convicted of breaking into a residence and killing an innocent woman who attended Eastern Illinois University with him. Some people think he should have been executed and cannot understand how I could believe he should not only be given a term of years but that I could choose to be his cellmate. However, I think they fail to realize what effect Mefloquine combined with Paxil and enormous amounts of alcohol can have.

Like people outside of prison, inmates will occasionally exchange gifts. My neighbor gave me a couple of pairs of state issued socks and a used thermal shirt. To reciprocate, I gave him a sweatshirt I had recently bought and after washing it shrank so much it no longer fit me. I knew the sweatshirt was a size or two too small, but I thought I would take a chance. The prison store was selling the Pakistan-made product for only $3. My cellmate asked what I got for him, and I said, "The pleasure of my company." He said the prison administration should pay him for putting up with my autistic antics. I asked him what he wanted. He was so difficult to shop for. While he thought about it, I said, "I already made you Tasters Choice coffee (TC is a luxury commodity at Stateville), and gave you a package of Swiss Rolls.  How about some Christmas cards from the Willow Creek Church?" Earlier we had talked about how dumb it was that prison staff gave them to us on Christmas day. Even if we had regular mail service, they would not have arrived until at least New Year's Eve. With Stateville mail, they would not have reached their destination until February.

Christmas evening was boring and I cannot even recall what I did. I became so bored that I began to look through the religious literature donated by the church. There was a booklet entitled "How to Survive on the Streets" which was meant for possible parolees. I had a life sentence and I tossed that one back onto my shelf. There was a "Spiritual Guide" that was over 200 pages long and included a calendar going to the year 2017. I commented to my cellmate that they need to give inmates at Stateville a calendar going to year 2077. This must be for the Minimum Security Unit or the Northern Receiving Center. Another book was called "Freeway" and according to their pastor Bill Hybels, it was supposed to lead a prisoner to true freedom. I began to go through the interactive, easy to read book occasionally telling my cellmate some of the silly questions it asked as well as my comical, although brutally honest, answers. The book seemed designed for children and I thought it should come with a set of thick crayons. Possibly though it was appropriate for the level of intelligence and education of most men at Stateville.

While I flipped through the book Freeway, I stood by the cell bars. A guard downstairs yelled up to me a "Merry Christmas" and it was then I realized it was late. If he was getting ready to leave, the time was well past 10 p.m. After waving to him on the ground floor outside the sergeant's office, I thought it was time for me to leave myself. The best gift of Christmas I gave myself was sleep. Only in my dreams did I experience freedom.

40 comments:

  1. It's a shame you don't have a donate button! I'd certainly donate to this superb blog!
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  2. Glad to see you haven't lost your sense of humor, Paul !

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    1. Good post, Paul. Very witty and amusing (although your situation is very sad and a terrible injustice). Looking for things to enrich your life while you wait in this hell must be very difficult. You are in my prayers quite often.

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  3. Though you seem to have compassion or empathy towards your cellmate, in a previous blog post you did not seem to be for the idea of pro football players wearing pink to support breast cancer awareness. I have read many of your blogs. I came across your blog one October looking up info on the Stateville Haunted house. As a cancer survivor myself, 6 1/2 years to be exact, it helps to see the support of pink. It is a chance to bring awareness so people are mindful of the disease and maybe donate to further research or tests for the poor to catch the disease at an early stage. Maybe ,because you see your cellmate everyday, you feel for his circumstances as opposed to someone who you have never seen and had cancer like myself. I can promise you that the cancer center is a hellish place as well. Having six surgeries, reconstruction, so many I.V.s that I was bleeding under my skin. 39 radiation treatments which left me with burnt boils and leather skin in that area which was radiated. I have seen cancer patients loose weight and die before my eyes. Families crying, doctors taking people into the little room and closing the door to give the talk. Being in a radiation chamber is hell. When the hospital doors slide open to the fresh outside air i was in my own prison of my body. Still tied to the hospital for more treatment another day. Another day of medicine that made me throw up on the side of the road, another day of burns, another day of worrying if my husband would leave me for someone who was healthy or still in a beautiful body. I don't mean to complain about my life but just because many of us are free, we are all in our own prisons. I do not know you or if you are innocent or guilty but even though your sadness of not being able to have a job or a wife or children is your prison, many people who have experienced a job or having children or a spouse have other sufferings which we cannot escape from either. Like illness. Is your prison for which you suffer in any more hellish? Is mine? That is life. Yes you do have a life. You are able to eat, to read, to exercise , to speak. To laugh. It is not the life you want but the life you are living. Make the best out of your prison existence as we are all making the best of our own. Hopefully you will change your mind about the color pink in october.

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    1. My paternal grandmother died of brain cancer when I was a child. I know the horrific pain and suffering many with the disease experience. It was so great that I even prayed that she would die and was relieved she did not long after. You should not lecture me on not being empathetic to your plight as well as other women with breast cancer. However, I disagree with the tremendous public attention it receives over other numerous diseases. I also disagree with the NFL forcing players to wear pink. The sport and Western society has become demasculinized to a degree that I find repulsive.

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    2. Firstly, my intent was not to lecture. My intention was to give you another point of view. You are closed away from society and may be misinterpreting breast cancer awareness month. I will respond to you about men wearing pink this last time because I do not want to absorb your blog volunteer's energy typing on what should be going towards your own cause. But here are a few facts. The reason why breast cancer advocacy is so fierce is because only recently insurance companies have begun to cover reconstruction of the cancerous breast removed with an implant as to balance and give asymmetry to the body. The implant must be replaced in a few years which requires more surgery. Insurance companies may or may not cover any future surgery. You see, in the past, woman's health was not a priority and even today we are behind on research compared to men. Most medical students studied off the male body and the woman body wasn't even an example. Also many of the medicines that apply for one cancer are researched and applied to other diseases. Example, lung cancer and breast cancer that has spread to the lung have used common medication. So research applied to breast cancer may also work for other diseases. That is why even though I was diagnosed with breast cancer, I wouldn't care if more research applied toward other diseases. Research is research and you never know where it will lead. Also, in a capitalist society you so advocate, all non profits can fundraise. If we gave every fundraiser for every disease the same amount of money, wouldn't that be socialism ? Also as far as why you keep combining the demasculinized male of today's society with football players wearing pink in October, the two do not go hand in hand. A man wearing a pink ribbon or a cheap pink rubber bracelet is not viewed at all in the free society as a representation of his sexuality. It just shows he is supporting a cause. Many players WANT to wear pink because they have lost or have a woman close to them who have died or are in battle against breast cancer. It can be compared to a man smoking a cigar with a pink wrapper that his wife just gave birth to a baby girl. You would not question the new dad's sexuality but view him as being supportive of his wife and new baby girl. I agree that some football players are wearing pink because of political pressure but sometimes political pressure can save a life. Such as you requesting your readers to write the governor. That is you trying to right a wrong by using political pressure? Yes the male of today has become more demasculinized but you are in a prison which heightens male dominance. Men on the outside are not in a position to have to shun everything that would make them seem homosexual or be beaten up. They are not in the same environment as you. They are in relationships with women who may have breast cancer and it is more important to show support to the woman in their life than worry about what men in cell houses are going to do to them. It is two separate worlds. You are using your life experiences and judging a world you have not been part of for twenty years. Has society changed? For the better or worse? Both. My intent isn't to lecture you. But you are looking at things from a limited vantage. I do agree with you that t.v. is oversexualized and even the news reporters look like vegas showgirls , but that's not how we all behave and you are just seeing part of the picture. I would like to send you books. Please tell me the rules. Can I send used books? Anonymous? Also, why don't you spend every waking hour reading law and trying to look for technicalities in your case for appeal? I will keep reading your blog and that was my last rebuttal about pink and football. You are a very good writer, are highly intelligent and I admire the way you protect your health and dignity. Just make sure you use your depressive energy and channel it into working on law.

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    3. yet another anon posterApril 22, 2014 at 9:56 PM

      It bothers me that the football teams paid good money for the pink uniforms, because the money that was spent could have been instead donated to the cancer foundation. Awareness IS important but that money could have been put to better use.

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  4. I think your case would be helped the most by more publicity. If someone were to make a documentary film about it, even a short one, that would be the ideal. Like without the documentaries about them, the "Memphis 3" (wrongly convicted for murdering 3 little boys), would probably still be languishing. Because the less people know about it, the less anyone picks it up and runs with it. If your name is not a household name in IL, if not elsewhere, then that's bad too. What you should do, in my view, is have someone who helps you on the outside like whoever publishes this blog and runs this site start a serious Facebook page about you and also other social media as well (such as Twitter). Social media is where it's at and should not be underestimated; revolutions in Arab countries have occurred with essentially social media planning. The case is too low-key still; it should be, on the Facebook page, like a big thing made about how you were initially misconstrued as one of the Brown's Chicken killers, etc (because that case had garnered national if not international attention). And how that (probably) led to your arrest and subsequent conviction or at least influenced the severity of the sentencing in some way (like back then they had never caught Luna or Degorski; so to some you were viewed, for some reason, as like the next closest thing back then). I would set up a Facebook page for you at least (since I honestly don't really have the means or know-how to really make a documentary) but I also wouldn't want to overstep any bounds and set up a Facebook page about someone when I don't know if they'd want it, etc etc. You never know. Even out of a couple or a few hundred (hopefully more) "likes" or "follows" someone who liked it might be in a position to do more for you besides just social media pages and such. And if anyone else out there is an amateur filmmaker or documentary maker, I think the story of Paul, and his initial confusion with the Browns' Chicken murders, and subsequent conviction and "LWOP" on 'accountability theory' would make a really good documentary film. Certainly documentaries are made and aired everyday on less compelling topics.

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    1. You are absolutely correct, however, I lack the capability of gaining further public outreach. The people who assist with this blog are already overwhelmed and do not have the skills to promote my injustice via social media. If anyone would like to volunteer, they can contact me or those who operate this blog at paulmodrowski@gmail.com. They can also act unilaterally or coordinate activities with others. I am only one person, alone and confined to a cage. I need help: legal, investigative, social media, and otherwise.

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    2. I want to help but my family doesn't want me to use my real name. Can I contact news sources using a pseudonym?

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  5. I find it strange how you think that a combination of drugs could cause an otherwise normal person to commit homicide. I disagree.

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    1. I would probably tend to agree with your disagreement on that point. But there is an element of uncertainty as well. Mefloquine, an antimalarial agent (no longer used by the US Army), does not report actual homicidal or violent side effects. Though it does report possible mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, and hallucinations which *some* military families believe have led to suicides or even murders or other violence. Nothing has thus far been conclusively proven however. Paxil likewise, in all research online that I"ve done, does not indicate (even under "rare" or "extremely rare") side effects that would cause impulsive or uncontrollable violence. (Of course, if you screw around long enough on Google searches you can probably find people claiming Paxil -- or other antidepressants -- caused them everything from weight gain to suicide attempts and aggression, so....that's the internet). As for alcohol, many killers and violent criminals were in fact under the influence of alcohol and/or other intoxicants when they 'acted out'. It has never exculpated any of them, to my knowledge. Nor has intoxication or 'drug side effect' claims ever shortened sentences (again, that I know of). Ted Bundy admitted that he was often intoxicated when he committed his murders (which were likewise sex-type crimes, like Mertz's). That and his last-ditch "porno addiction" explanation never made anyone that I know of think of him as somehow less guilty. (After all, if porn or nude picture 'usage' by males inevitably *caused* violence against women then in my thinking women would be dropping like flies all day everyday to sex predators). Likewise if Paxil and or Mefloquine -- the former of which is used by many many people daily as we type and the latter of which has been used by travelers for years -- genuinely led to atrocious sex crimes, one would think we would have heard much more about that phenomenon by now and such cases would be much more common.

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    2. I hear you Paul. however would you not agree that homicide is a very abnormal act? of course I know the answer to that. but could you ever imagine taking the next step and horrifying somebody that never saw it coming? I couldn't. I've taken many combinations of drugs and I have never felt that. I don't get it.

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    3. There is no way to ascertain with absolute certainty that the combination of Mefloquine, Paxil, and alcohol contributed to the actions of my cellmate. However, I believe that it had a strong possibility and the court should give him an evidentiary hearing where expert witnesses can be called to testify. At his trial, the side effects of Mefloquine were not known nor did Paxil have a warning not to take with alcohol. Regardless of legal proceedings, I have come to know Anthony on a personal level and it is apparent to me he is not a homicidal maniac nor is it just that he spend his entire life in prison.

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    4. Anonymous of Feb. 19th: The only way to convince you is for you to inject yourself with Mefloquine and then begin taking Paxil, a psychotropic drug. Finally, go on a drinking binge and see how you act. Many things can't be proven with absolute certainty.

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  6. When you force someone to take drugs, without knowing (or even worse, knowing but not disclosing) side effects, incidents are going to happen. You have a man who survived the horrors of war, fighting for us, comes home and commits what we all agree is a horrific crime. I am curious how much mental health treatment is available to our military heroes once they finish their tours.

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  7. Look, Mertz did a terrible thing and he is incarcerated in Stateville paying for his crime. This is Paul's blog and like it or not Mertz is a part of his world. I'm glad for Paul they can can co-exist peacefully.

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  8. Best wishes from Calgary.

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  9. You got a degree from Lewis? In what?

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    1. Yeah what was Paul's major?

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    2. Neat. You must be really smart.

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  10. Yeah what was your major? I'm assuming finance or econ or something similar.

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    1. There were only 5 majors offered at Joliet C.C. through Lewis University. As you may suspect, none of them were extremely difficult or intellectual. I chose to pursue a degree in political science. I graduated with a perfect 4.0 GPA which people may belittle because of where I was. However, the classes were taught by professors from Lewis and no other prisoner that I am aware of ever graduated with straight A's during their tutelage.

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  11. So who would we contact in the media to get the word out?

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    1. Readers can contact reporters who write columns in newspapers or those who create stories for television whether that be local or national programs. There are also a lot of social media outlets, but I have no experience with these. I was in prison long before the Internet became popular.

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  12. Blog readers and followers! Please read comments in post #253 "the invasion of Ukraine" and help Paul

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  13. Do you get the History Channel?

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  14. Paul needs a facebook page.

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    1. How can he have a facebook page WHEN PRISONERS DON'T HAVE ACCESS TO THE INTERNET, smarty pants?!?!

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    2. Someone could start a "Free Paul Modrowski" page.

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    3. Anonymous, 11-11-14: Everyone here except you realizes that this person is talking about someone starting a Facebook page for Paul w/ regard to his case. So who is the moron?

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    4. If someone is serious about creating a FB page on my behalf, they should contact me in writing. This blog has to come to an end and I may entertain another outlet to the public. (My address is shown in the right side column near the top of the blog.)

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  15. Paul you defend Mertz as if he accidently killed his victim. The fact is he committed home invasion,he then beat her,raped her,strangled her and stabbed her to death.If Anthony Mertz does not deserve to spend the rest of his life in prison then who does Paul?

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    1. IIRC, Paul doesn't believe in life sentences for anyone.

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    2. The sentence of natural life without the possibility of parole should not exist. When execution is inappropriate, the maximum time any criminal should face is 20 years.

      Your facts are incorrect re: Mertz's case. You are not as aware of the crime(s), Mertz, or the criminal justice system as I am.

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  16. You mention Mancow Muller's low regard for criminals. You may find it amusing to learn of the evening I spent with him (he was friends with the owner of a bar of which I was general manager). In addition to being among the most unpleasant people I have ever met, he shoveled cocaine up his nose the entire night whilst sexually harassing the waitresses. His righteous indignation would serve him better if he directed it inward.

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    1. And mancow claims to be a christian?

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    2. Mancow Muller uses cocaine and is excessively flirtatious with women? I cannot believe it. He seemed so poised and proper on the air.

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    3. He actually IS a Christian.

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If you choose Name / URL, you can write any name and you don't need a URL. Or you can choose Anonymous. Paul loves getting your Comments. They are all mailed to him.